Way Home – Planning Overview

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Dan

Are you looking for a novel to use as an engaging, meaningful read-aloud experience in your classroom? Look no further!

Way Home by Gregory Rogers and Libby Hathorn is an inspiring story of resilience, friendship, acceptance and hope that will captivate the hearts and minds of students.

This beloved children’s book carries a powerful message about sticking up for yourself and standing up for others – it also provides excellent opportunities for teachers to discuss valuable lessons with their students.

Related: For more, check out our planning overview on Cogheart by Peter Bunzl here.

Way Home: A Storyline Overview

Way Home is a children’s book written by Libby Hathorn and illustrated by Gregory Rogers. The story follows a young boy named Shane, who lives in the city with his mother. One day, Shane gets lost on the way home from school and finds himself in an unfamiliar part of town.

Shane becomes increasingly scared and disoriented as the sun sets and darkness falls. He encounters various characters, including a homeless man, a street musician, and a group of teenagers. Each encounter brings new challenges for Shane as he tries to find his way home.

Shane learns valuable lessons about perseverance, courage, and kindness throughout his journey. He discovers that some people can offer help and support even amid fear and uncertainty.

As the night wears on, Shane eventually makes it back to his neighbourhood with the help of a kind stranger. He is reunited with his worried mother, who greets him with open arms.

Overall, Way Home is a heartwarming tale about resilience and community. It encourages young readers to be brave in the face of adversity and to look for kindness wherever they go.

Theme Of Way Home

The story of “Way Home” teaches readers several valuable lessons. Firstly, it emphasizes the importance of resilience and perseverance in difficult situations. Shane, the main character, faces numerous challenges on his journey home but never gives up hope.

Secondly, the story highlights the power of community and kindness. Shane encounters various characters who offer him help and support, showing that people are always willing to lend a hand.

Finally, “Way Home” teaches readers the importance of empathy and understanding towards those struggling or lost. The story encourages children to be aware of their surroundings and to offer help when they see someone in need.

Overall, “Way Home” is a heartwarming tale that promotes essential values such as courage, kindness, and compassion. It is an excellent read for children learning about empathy and social skills.

Teaching Opportunities

  1. Vocabulary: The story includes several advanced vocabulary words such as “scurried,” “lurched,” and “dusk.” Teachers can use these words to introduce new vocabulary, discuss their meanings, and encourage students to use them in their writing.
  2. Grammar: The story is rich in descriptive language, including adjectives and adverbs that help paint a vivid picture of the scenes Shane encounters on his journey home. Teachers can use this story to teach students about the proper use of adjectives and adverbs and how they can enhance the quality of writing.
  3. Spelling: As with any text, there are ample opportunities to teach spelling using “Way Home.” Teachers can encourage students to identify unfamiliar or challenging words in the text and practice spelling them aloud or in writing.
  4. Writing devices: The author employs several literary devices throughout the story, including simile (“the wind blew like an angry beast”) and metaphor (“the city was a maze”). Teachers can use these examples to introduce literary devices to students and encourage them to incorporate them into their writing.
  5. Critical thinking: Finally, the story provides opportunities for essential thinking discussions around themes such as resilience, community support, empathy, and perseverance. Teachers can lead discussions around these themes, encouraging students to reflect on their own experiences and how they might apply these lessons in real life.

Challenging Vocabulary

Here are some challenging vocabulary words from the story “Way Home”:

  1. scurried
  2. lurching
  3. gnarled
  4. tattered
  5. grime
  6. debris
  7. bustling
  8. murky
  9. desolate
  10. labyrinth

These words may be unfamiliar to some readers and provide an opportunity for vocabulary development and exploration in the classroom or at home.

Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan 1:

Vocabulary Development Objective: Students will develop their vocabulary by identifying and defining challenging words from “Way Home.”

Activities:

  1. Have students read “Way Home” individually or in small groups.
  2. Ask students to identify any unfamiliar or challenging words from the story.
  3. In pairs or small groups, have students use dictionaries or online tools to define these words and share their definitions with the class.
  4. As a class, discuss the meaning of each word and how it is used in the story.
  5. Please encourage students to use these new words in their writing.

Assessment:

Students can demonstrate their understanding of new vocabulary by correctly creating sentences using each word.

Lesson Plan 2:

Writing Devices Objective: Students will learn about literary devices and how they enhance writing.

Activities:

  1. Have students read “Way Home” individually or in small groups.
  2. Ask students to identify examples of simile, metaphor, and other literary devices used in the story.
  3. In pairs or small groups, have students create a list of literary devices in the story and write examples of each device.
  4. As a class, discuss each device and its purpose in enhancing storytelling.
  5. Please encourage students to incorporate one or more literary devices into their writing.

Assessment:

Students can demonstrate their understanding of literary devices by writing a short story using at least two literary devices.

Lesson Plan 3:

Critical Thinking Objective: Students will reflect on themes presented in “Way Home” and consider how they apply to real-life situations.

Activities:

  1. Have students read “Way Home” individually or in small groups.
  2. Ask students to identify themes presented in the story, such as resilience, community support, empathy, and perseverance.
  3. In pairs or small groups, have students discuss how these themes relate to real-life situations they may have experienced or witnessed.
  4. As a class, lead a discussion around these themes and encourage students to share their reflections on how they might apply these lessons in their own lives.
  5. Encourage further consideration through journaling prompts related to personal experiences with resilience, community support, empathy, and perseverance.

Assessment:

Students can demonstrate their understanding of critical thinking by writing a reflection on one theme presented in the story and how it applies to their own life experiences.

Website Resources

https://video.link/w/11AHb

CLPE.org.uk: This website briefly overviews the book “Way Home” by Libby Hathorn and Gregory Rogers. The page includes a synopsis of the story, information about the author and illustrator, and some suggested teaching activities for using the book in the classroom.

Link

TES.com: This resource on TES.com provides a lesson plan for using “Way Home” in Year 4, 5, and 6 classrooms. The program includes objectives, resources needed, activities for introducing and exploring the text, and assessment suggestions.

Link

TeachingBooks.net: This website offers additional resources related to “Way Home,” including interviews with the author and illustrator, audio recordings of selected passages from the book, teaching guides and lesson plans, and more.

Link

FAQ

Q: What is “Way Home” about?

A: “Way Home” is a children’s picture book that tells the story of a boy who gets lost in the city and must find his way home. Along the way, he encounters various obstacles and helpful strangers who guide him.

Q: What age range is “Way Home” appropriate for?

A: “Way Home” is recommended for children ages 4-8.

Q: Who are the author and illustrator of “Way Home”?

A: The author of “Way Home” is Libby Hathorn, and the illustrator is Gregory Rogers.

Q: What themes are explored in “Way Home”?

A: Themes explored in “Way Home” include resilience, community support, empathy, and perseverance.

Q: How can teachers use “Way Home” in their classrooms?

A: Teachers can use “Way Home” to teach vocabulary development, literary devices, critical thinking skills, and more. The book also contributes to discussions around themes such as resilience and empathy.

Q: Are additional resources available for teaching with “Way Home?”

A: Yes! TeachingBooks.net offers interviews with the author and illustrator, audio recordings of selected passages from the book, teaching guides and lesson plans, and more.

Q: Where can I purchase a copy of “Way Home?”

A: You can purchase a copy of “Way Home” through major online retailers such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble. It may also be available at your local bookstore or library.

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England

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