35 Poems About Julius Caesar

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Dan

Welcome to our collection of thought-provoking poems inspired by William Shakespeare’s timeless tragedy, “Julius Caesar”. This anthology seeks to explore the rich tapestry of emotions, themes and characters woven into this iconic play.

From the complex, power-hungry Brutus to the charismatic and doomed Julius Caesar himself, these poems delve deep into the heart of human ambition, loyalty and betrayal.

Just as Shakespeare’s play transcends the confines of its Roman setting to speak to the universal human condition, so too do these poems seek to capture the timeless essence of this monumental work.

Whether you’re a seasoned Shakespearean scholar or a casual reader, we invite you to journey with us through these verses and experience anew the captivating world of “Julius Caesar”.

Related: For more, check out our Poems About King Lear  here.

free verse poems

Five Free Verse Poems About Julius Caesar

1. Shadows of Power

In the hallowed halls of Rome,

echoes of ambition dance,

Caesar, the sun at zenith, casting long shadows.

His name, a thunderclap in the Roman sky.

But the ides of March whisper their warning,

the storm is coming,

and even the mighty cannot command the winds.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

2. The Solitude of Brutus

Brutus, caught in the spider’s web of conspiracy,

his heart a battlefield, loyalty and ambition warring.

A friend to Caesar, yet a son to Rome,

his dagger poised on the edge of destiny.

In the quiet night, his solitude echoes,

a man torn asunder by the weight of his choices.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

3. The Ghost of Caesar

A specter haunts the streets of Rome,

the ghost of Caesar, cloaked in betrayal.

His blood cries out from the Senate floor,

a haunting requiem for a fallen titan.

In death, he becomes more than a man,

an idea, a symbol, a rallying cry for an empire.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

4. Antony’s Lament

Antony, the faithful, stands among the ruins,

his heart ablaze with grief and fury.

Caesar’s spirit, a beacon in the darkness,

guiding his words, his actions, his revenge.

“Friends, Romans, countrymen,” he cries,

and Rome trembles under the weight of his sorrow.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

5. The Fall of Rome

The pillars of Rome crumble,

stained with the blood of Caesar.

Betrayal, like a serpent, slithers through the city,

poisoning hearts, minds, and souls.

In the end, Rome stands divided,

an empire shattered by the echoes of a single act.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

Related: For more, check out our Poems About A Midsummer Night’s Dream here.

Haiku Poem

Five Haiku Poems About Julius Caesar

1. Caesar’s Ascent

Caesar, sun rising,

Power’s intoxicating wine,

Rome in his shadow.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

2. Brutus’ Dilemma

Brutus, torn within,

Friend to Caesar, son to Rome,

In the night, he weeps.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

3. The Ides of March

Ides of March approach,

Betrayal’s cold and ruthless hand,

Caesar falls, Rome weeps.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

4. Antony’s Vow

Antony, heart sore,

Vows vengeance for his fallen friend,

Rome, a stage for war.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

5. Rome’s Ruin

Empire stained with blood,

Trust shattered, Rome stands divided,

Caesar’s ghost still haunts.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

Related: For more, check out our Poems About Hamlet here.

Limerick

Five Limerick Poems About Julius Caesar

1. Caesar’s Rise

In Rome, there once was a man,

Whose rule spread across the land.

But his friends did conspire,

With ambition and ire,

And on the Ides of March, made their stand.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

2. Brutus’ Strife

There once was a senator named Brutus,

Whose loyalty began to elude us.

Torn between friend and state,

He sealed Caesar’s fate,

In a scene that was truly gruesome.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

3. The Ides of March

On the fifteenth, Caesar was warned,

But he took no heed and scorned.

In the Senate, they gathered,

And with daggers, they lathered,

His life from him was torn.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

4. Antony’s Vengeance

Antony, filled with dismay,

Swore to make Brutus pay.

With a speech so clever,

He vowed to never,

Let Caesar’s death be in vain.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

5. Rome’s Downfall

In the aftermath of Caesar’s demise,

Rome was filled with cries.

Trust was broken,

Harsh words were spoken,

As an empire fell before their eyes.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

Related: For more, check out our Poems About Romeo And Juliet here.

Tanka

Five Tanka Poems About Julius Caesar

1. Caesar’s Ambition

Caesar, heart ablaze,

Climbs power’s treacherous peak.

But friends turn to foes,

In the Senate, daggers gleam,

Ambition’s price is steep.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

2. Brutus’ Conflict

Brutus, torn in two,

Friendship and duty at war.

In the silent night,

His decision echoes loud,

A friend lost, a traitor born.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

3. The Ides of March

Ides of March draw near,

The seer’s warning rings hollow.

Betrayal’s sting sharp,

Caesar falls beneath the knife,

Rome weeps for her fallen son.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

4. Antony’s Revenge

Antony, heartbroken,

Swears vengeance for his dear friend.

His words stir the crowd,

Rome becomes a stage for war,

Caesar’s ghost demands justice.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

5. Rome’s Desolation

Rome, once mighty, falls,

Trust shattered, hearts filled with dread.

Caesar’s ghost lingers,

An empire crumbles to dust,

Betrayal’s bitter aftermath.

By Dan Higgins, 2024

Related: For more, check out our article on Poems About Othello here.

Sonnet

Five Sonnet Poems About Julius Caesar

1. The Ides of March

By the time Caesar’s eyes met the Senate door,

The prophecy of soothsayer was clear.

A day of doom, of blood and gore,

The Ides of March, a date to fear.

Et tu, Brute? His final utterance,

Betrayed by Brutus, his closest kin.

In Rome’s heart, Caesar’s last dance,

A brutal end for power’s sin.

His lifeless eyes reflecting Rome’s fate,

A republic lost in shadows and deceit.

In the wake of power, friendship abates,

And at the foot of ambition, loyalty retreats.

By Dan Higgins 2024

2. The Ghost of Caesar

The ghost of Caesar, haunting still,

In the minds of those who schemed.

Their guilt, a poison, bitter pill,

In the ruins of the empire they dreamed.

Brutus, the noblest Roman of all,

Haunted by the specter of his deed.

In the face of duty, he did fall,

And planted betrayal’s bitter seed.

In sleep’s embrace, or waking hour,

The ghost of Caesar lingers on.

A reminder of power’s sour,

And the price paid at dawn.

By Dan Higgins 2024

3. Cassius’s Scheme

Cassius, with envy green and ambition wild,

Plotted against Caesar, Rome’s child.

With silver tongue and cunning mind,

He turned Brutus, once kind.

A puppeteer pulling strings unseen,

Crafting a plot most obscene.

In the name of Rome, so he said,

But it was for power that he bled.

Cassius, the architect of Rome’s fall,

In the end, lost it all.

His scheme, a tragic play,

Led Rome to its darkest day.

By Dan Higgins 2024

4. Antony’s Oration

Antony, with words like fire,

Stoked the crowd’s rising ire.

A eulogy for his fallen friend,

Marked the republic’s bitter end.

“Friends, Romans, countrymen,” he cried,

And with each word, Caesar’s ghost sighed.

He painted Brutus as a villain,

And the crowd, his words did fill in.

Antony, with rhetoric’s might,

Turned day into darkest night.

His speech, a rallying cry,

Echoed under Rome’s sky.

By Dan Higgins 2024

5. The Fall of Rome

With Caesar’s fall, began Rome’s end,

A wound too deep to mend.

The republic, once strong and free,

Became a shadow of its legacy.

Brutus, Cassius, and the conspirators brave,

Dug Rome’s grave.

Their actions, meant to save,

Only led Rome to the grave.

The fall of Rome, a tragedy told,

Of ambition, power, and gold.

A tale of men who dared to dream,

And caused the republic to scream.

By Dan Higgins 2024

Ode

Five Ode Poems About Julius Caesar

1. Ode to the Ides of March

Oh, the Ides of March, the day of dread,

When the noble Caesar bled.

In the Senate, under statue’s gaze,

A bloody end to Caesar’s days.

A prophecy foretold, yet ignored,

By Caesar, Rome’s once adored.

Oh, the Ides of March, a date of doom,

Marked the beginning of Rome’s gloom.

By Dan Higgins 2024

2. Ode to Brutus

Brutus, oh Brutus, of noble birth,

Your actions shook the very earth.

Betraying Caesar, your friend so dear,

Led to the end all Romans fear.

You sought to save the republic’s soul,

But your actions took a tragic toll.

Brutus, oh Brutus, your name lives on,

A symbol of loyalty gone wrong.

By Dan Higgins 2024

3. Ode to Cassius

Cassius, the mastermind of the plot,

Your envy a boiling pot.

With silver words and cunning plans,

You turned Brutus against Caesar’s hands.

Cassius, your ambition ran rife,

And it cost you your life.

In your quest for power and fame,

You set Rome aflame.

By Dan Higgins 2024

4. Ode to Antony

Antony, with your fiery speech,

You did the Roman heart reach.

“Friends, Romans, countrymen,” you cried,

And in their hearts, Caesar’s ghost sighed.

Antony, you stirred the crowd,

With your words, strong and loud.

In the wake of Caesar’s fall,

You answered Rome’s call.

By Dan Higgins 2024

5. Ode to Rome

Oh Rome, the eternal city,

Your fall is a tale of pity.

From the heights of power and glory,

You fell into a tragic story.

With Caesar’s death, you began to crumble,

Under the weight of betrayal’s rumble.

Oh Rome, your tale is told,

A warning to the bold.

By Dan Higgins 2024

Villanelle Poem

Five Villanelle Poems About Julius Caesar

1. The Ides of March

In Rome, where shadows whisper of the past,

The soothsayer’s words echo, stark and clear.

Beware, Caesar, of the Ides that cast.

A crown thrice offered, yet not held fast,

Power’s lure is potent, yet breeds fear.

In Rome, where shadows whisper of the past.

Et tu, Brute? A friendship unsurpassed,

Yet the Senate’s blade finds Caesar’s rear.

Beware, Caesar, of the Ides that cast.

A city weeps, its die has been cast,

As Antony speaks, his motive clear.

In Rome, where shadows whisper of the past.

The noblest Roman, his lot now cast,

Struggles with guilt, his conscience sear.

Beware, Caesar, of the Ides that cast.

Through blood and betrayal, a truth amassed:

That power corrupts those we hold dear.

In Rome, where shadows whisper of the past,

Beware, Caesar, of the Ides that cast.

By Dan Higgins 2024

2. The Fall of Greatness

Caesar walks in Rome, his head held high,

His name rings through the streets, a potent cry.

But greatness falls, as all men must die.

The Senators conspire, their motives sly,

In cloaked whispers, their daggers lie.

Caesar walks in Rome, his head held high.

Brutus broods, a furrowed sigh,

In loyalty and love, a painful tie.

But greatness falls, as all men must die.

The Ides of March, the fateful sky,

A soothsayer’s warning, ignored by the sly.

Caesar walks in Rome, his head held high.

Et tu, Brute? A heartrending cry,

Betrayal’s sting, a friendship awry.

But greatness falls, as all men must die.

In Rome’s heart, where Caesar’s body lie,

Echoes the truth, that power can’t defy:

Caesar walks in Rome, his head held high,

But greatness falls, as all men must die.

By Dan Higgins 2024

3. Brutus’ Guilt

In the Senate’s hall, a deed was done,

A friend betrayed, a battle begun.

In Brutus’ heart, guilt weighs a ton.

The Ides of March, under the sun,

Caesar fell, his reign undone.

In the Senate’s hall, a deed was done.

Et tu, Brute? The words stun,

A friendship broken, a trust undone.

In Brutus’ heart, guilt weighs a ton.

Through Rome’s streets, the rumors run,

Of a power seized, a victory won.

In the Senate’s hall, a deed was done.

Yet Brutus mourns, his joy none,

For in his hands, he holds a bloody gun.

In Brutus’ heart, guilt weighs a ton.

From the act, he cannot run,

His guilt remains, it can’t be undone.

In the Senate’s hall, a deed was done,

In Brutus’ heart, guilt weighs a ton.

By Dan Higgins 2024

4. Antony’s Eulogy

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears,

For I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

In our hearts, his memory sears.

His ambition, they say, was fierce,

Yet his love for Rome never grew dim.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears,

The noble Brutus, his conscience clear,

Yet his honor led him to a deadly sin.

In our hearts, his memory sears.

The Ides of March, a day to fear,

Caesar’s fall, Brutus’ grim win.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears,

A eulogy, a tear,

For a ruler gone, a loss grim.

In our hearts, his memory sears.

So let it be with Caesar, his death near,

His name lives on, his legacy within.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears,

In our hearts, his memory sears.

By Dan Higgins 2024

5. The Ghost of Caesar

Through Rome’s streets, a specter walks,

Caesar’s ghost, to Brutus, talks,

In sleep’s grasp, the conscience balks.

The Ides of March, the soothsayer’s squawks,

Yet in his heart, Brutus locks.

Through Rome’s streets, a specter walks.

Et tu, Brute? The memory stalks,

A friend betrayed, the Senate mocks.

In sleep’s grasp, the conscience balks.

A deed done, the city gawks,

In Brutus’ heart, guilt knocks.

Through Rome’s streets, a specter walks.

A ghost’s whisper, a message chalks,

From beyond the grave, Caesar talks.

In sleep’s grasp, the conscience balks.

In Rome’s heart, a silence falls,

As the ghost of Caesar through its streets walks.

Through Rome’s streets, a specter walks,

In sleep’s grasp, the conscience balks.

By Dan Higgins 2024

As we reach the end of our poetic journey, we hope these verses have provided a fresh and insightful exploration of “Julius Caesar”. In examining the intricate dynamics of power, friendship, and treachery through the lens of poetry, we’ve aimed to echo the timeless resonance of Shakespeare’s masterpiece.

We believe that these poems, much like the play itself, hold a mirror up to humanity, reflecting our own strengths, flaws, and complexities.

Thank you for embarking on this voyage with us, and may the enduring spirit of “Julius Caesar” continue to inspire and provoke thought. Whether you’re returning to the world of Shakespeare or venturing into it for the first time, we trust that this collection has enriched your understanding and appreciation of this classic tragedy.

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